All Published Articles

Lynn L. Bergeson, "Canada Eyes Hazardous Products Regulation," Chemical Processing, September 23, 2014.

On August 9, 2014, Canada published a proposal for adopting the Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). GHS compliance is a big issue for just about all manufacturers, and understanding the approach of our neighbor to the north is important. This column summarizes the highlights.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "NNI and NASA Co-Sponsor Technical Interchange Meeting on Carbon Nanotubes," Nanotechnology Now, September 8, 2014.

The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO) announced in the September 8, 2014, Federal Register that it will hold a technical interchange meeting entitled "Realizing the Promise of Carbon Nanotubes -- Challenges, Opportunities and the Pathway to Commercialization" on September 15, 2014. See http://nano.gov/2014CNTTechInterchange The meeting is sponsored by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and co-sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). According to the notice, the objectives of the meeting are to identify, discuss, and report the technical barriers preventing the production of carbon nanotube-based materials with electrical and mechanical properties approaching theoretical values, and to explore ways to overcome these barriers.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA’s Air Office Recommends Lowering Ozone NAAQS," Pollution Engineering CoffeHaus Blog, September 8, 2014.

The EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) has concluded that there is adequate evidence for lowering the existing National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (O3) from 75 parts per billion to between 70 ppb and 60 ppb. The recommendation is found in a 600 page long Policy Assessment for the Review of the Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards, issued on Aug. 29, 2014.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "Misleading Recycled Content Claims are Criminal," Pollution Engineering, September 1, 2014.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has stepped up its enforcement initiatives and recently settled two cases with companies that market plastic lumber and related products. FTC alleged that these companies misled consumers in violation of Section 5 of the FTC Act in their marketing materials regarding the environmental attributes of their products.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "Australia Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority Will Hold Nanotechnology Regulation Symposium," Nanotechnology Now, August 26, 2014.

The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) will host a nanotechnology regulation symposium on October 28, 2014. See http://apvma.gov.au/node/11191 APVMA states that it "has worked over many years to progressively develop a regulatory framework for nanoscale agvet chemicals and chemical products." APVMA intends the symposium to provide industry and regulators with an opportunity for dialogue on the future regulation of nanopesticides and veterinary nanomedicines.

Lynn L. Bergeson, Meglena Mihova, "Nanomaterials and Public Disclosure: Are European Nano Product Registries the Answer?," Natural Resources & Environment, Volume 29, Number 1, Summer 2014.

Nano product registries in Europe are the newest twist to satiating the public’s relentless “right to know.” Nominally intended to prevent hazards, facilitate monitoring, and promote consumer choice, nano product registries also risk stigmatizing nano products, diverting limited government and private resources, and potentially creating commercial barriers to a promising technology. This article in the American Bar Association’s Natural Resources & Environment magazine focuses on efforts of multiple European countries that are presently at varying stages of establishing product registries to keep track of nanomaterials and the products that contain them. After outlining the stated purposes of these registries and explaining how they operate, the article explores whether they are achieving their stated goals or inadvertently inviting unintended consequences.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "DOT Eyes Safe Transport of Crude Oil," Chemical Processing, August 14, 2014.

On August 1, 2014, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), which falls under the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), published an important proposed rule intended to improve the safety of transportation of large quantities of flammable materials by rail — particularly crude oil and ethanol. The proposal responds to several catastrophic railcar derailments, all involving crude oil and resulting in fatalities. The DOT also issued on the same day a companion Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR).

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA Approves Petition for Exemption," Chemical Processing, July 22, 2014.

On June 19, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a direct final rule exempting manufacturers of three chemical substances from certain reporting-process-and-use information requirements under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule for those compounds. This column discusses the rule and the potential value of public petitioning.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "DOT’s Emergency Order Limits Crude Transport," Pollution Engineering, July 1, 2014.

The growing number of rail mishaps involving oil is attracting much press attention and now regulatory attention as well. On May 7, 2014, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) issued an emergency order requiring all railroads operating trains containing bulk quantities of UN 1267, petroleum crude oil, Class 3 that either originates or is sourced from the Bakken formation in the Williston Basin (Bakken crude oil) to notify State Emergency Response Commissions (SERC) about the operation of these trains through their states. This article discusses this important topic.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA Proposes Rule to Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Pollution Engineering, July 1, 2014.

On June 2, 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an ambitious and likely contentious rule to diminish significantly the United States’ contribution to greenhouse gases (GHG). The rule is proposed under the authority of the Clean Air Act (CAA) and takes direct aim at the coal industry by requiring a 30 percent reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants by 2030, using 2005 as the baseline year. This column summarizes key aspects of the rule and its implications for Pollution Engineering readers.

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