TSCA

Charles M. Auer, Lynn L. Bergeson, and James V. Aidala, "EPA's Action Plans Signal a New Chapter for TSCA While Informing the Future Legislative Debate on Chemicals," Environmental Law Reporter, March 2010.

Late last December, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa P. Jackson announced action plans on phthalates, long-chain chlorinated paraffins (LCCPs), and short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs). The four action plans are the first of many, as EPA intends to issue eight more or so in 2010. This EPA initiative announces actions that are almost breathtaking in scope, and its development and implementation of the action plan items will set a number of new precedents -- and possibly shape future legislative proposals -- that industry will need to participate in and monitor closely.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA Working on Test Rule for Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes/TSCA Section 8(a) Rule for Several Nanoscale Substances," NanoBusiness Alliance Newsletter, Issue 8, June 18, 2009.

As you may know, twice each year the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishes a detailed listing of all matters on which it is working. The document is referred to as the Semiannual Regulatory Agenda, and is published each spring and fall. The most recent spring issue was published on May 11, 2009.

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA Issues Draft NMSP Concept Paper and TSCA Inventory Paper," Small Times Magazine, August 10, 2007.

The EPA's recently released paper, TSCA Inventory Status of Nanoscale Substances -- General Approach, is important for developers of nanotechnologies. Nanomaterials that meet the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) definition of "chemical substance" are subject to TSCA reporting requirements because they may exhibit properties different from the same substances in the bulk scale. A chemical substance means, in relevant part, "any organic or inorganic substance of a particular molecular identity." 

Lynn L. Bergeson, "TSCA Inventory Status of Nanoscale Substances a Must-Read for Materials Developers," Small Times Magazine, August 10, 2007.

The EPA's recently released paper, TSCA Inventory Status of Nanoscale Substances -- General Approach, is important for developers of nanotechnologies. Nanomaterials that meet the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) definition of "chemical substance" are subject to TSCA reporting requirements because they may exhibit properties different from the same substances in the bulk scale. A chemical substance means, in relevant part, "any organic or inorganic substance of a particular molecular identity." 

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA Issues Draft NMSP Concept Paper and TSCA Inventory Paper," ABA Pesticides, Chemical Regulation, and Right-to-Know Committee Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 3, August 2007.

On July 12, 2007, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published in the Federal Register three separate notices related to the long-awaited Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). All of the notices and accompanying documents are available online.

Lynn L. Bergeson and Joseph E. Plamondon, "TSCA and Engineered Nanoscale Substances," Nanotechnology Law & Business, March 2007.

The federal law that regulates new and existing chemical substances, including engineered nanoscale chemical substances, is the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). While there is much debate over how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should deploy its significant TSCA authority to address potential risks to human health and the environment posed by engineered nanoscale materials, there is no doubt that EPA is already doing so. This article provides a general overview of TSCA as it relates to new and existing chemical substances, and discusses how EPA may go about discharging its significant TSCA authority with respect to engineered nanoscale substances. 

Lynn L. Bergeson, "Nanoscale Materials and TSCA:  EPA’s NPPTAC Recommends a Framework for a Voluntary Program," Environmental Quality Management, Spring 2006.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Pollution Prevention and Toxics Advisory Committee (NPPTAC) forwarded to EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson on November 22, 2005, its document entitled Overview of Issues for Consideration by NPPTAC. The Overview of Issues document sets forth NPPTAC’s “analysis and views” on a framework for a voluntary program on existing engineered nanoscale materials. The framework is intended to complement the new nanoscale chemicals requirements promulgated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

Lynn L. Bergeson, "EPA Considers How Best to Regulate Nanoscale Materials," Environmental Quality Management, Autumn 2005.

In a May 10, 2005, Federal Register notice, EPA announced, in an understated way, its decision to convene a public meeting on 'nanoscale materials.' The meeting notice represents the Agency's first public foray into harnessing some of nanotechnology’s promise within a regulatory framework created almost three decades ago with the enactment of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

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